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FEED & NUTRITION

Learn about all aspects of the dairy cow ration, from harvest to storage and balancing additives to forage supplementation.

LATEST

Immunity is not solely explained by environmental exposure to foreign agents and other environmental factors such as diet, temperature, housing and so on; additionally, there is an important genetic component to immunity. In fact, the immune system is under tight genetic control.

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The transition period for dairy cows is often defined as three weeks prior to calving until three weeks after calving. During this time, the cow experiences dramatic changes in feed intake, nutritional requirements and physiological status that affect nutrient balances, milk yield and composition, health and reproductive performance.

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The most common technique in North America for harvest of forage crops is making hay. When put up correctly, hay is cost-effective, meets the nutritional needs of nearly all classes of livestock and, if protected from weather damage, can be stored almost indefinitely.

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Nutraceuticals have been around since mankind started to consume food. What they are and how they have been used were just not recognized as such – since the term is a relatively new invention.

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The importance of post-fresh health in dairy cows has been well documented. Cows that get off to a good start peak higher, milk more, breed back quicker, have lower 60-day cull rates and are more profitable.

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Moisture measurement of forages is important during both harvest and feeding. Inaccurate moisture measurement during hay harvest can lead to mould, excessive dry matter and quality loss, heat generation and even fire.

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